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The tenant of wildfell hall

The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall Ein Hinweis zu älteren Browsern

Die Herrin von Wildfell Hall ist ein Roman von Anne Brontë aus dem Jahr Erzählt wird die Geschichte der jungen Helen Lawrence, die unter den Eskapaden und Fehlverhalten ihres alkohol- und. Die Herrin von Wildfell Hall (Originaltitel The Tenant of Wildfell Hall) ist ein Roman von Anne Brontë aus dem Jahr Erzählt wird die Geschichte der jungen. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (Penguin Classics) | Davies, Stevie, Brontë, Anne | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall | Bronte, Anne | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (English Library) von Brontë, Anne; Hargreaves, G.; Gerin, Winifred beim dobradozor.se - ISBN - ISBN

the tenant of wildfell hall

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (Penguin Classics) | Davies, Stevie, Brontë, Anne | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und. Die Herrin von Wildfell Hall ist ein Roman von Anne Brontë aus dem Jahr Erzählt wird die Geschichte der jungen Helen Lawrence, die unter den Eskapaden und Fehlverhalten ihres alkohol- und. With an essay by Winifred Gerin. 'She looked so like herself that I knew not how to bear it' In this sensational, hard-hitting and passionate tale of marital cruelty. Gilbert Markham is deeply intrigued by Helen Graham, a beautiful and secretive young woman who has moved into nearby Wildfell Hall with her young son. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»The Tenant of Wildfell Hall«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! When the mysterious and beautiful young widow Helen Graham becomes the new tenant at Wildfell Hall rumors immediately begin to swirl around her. As her..​. With an essay by Winifred Gerin. 'She looked so like herself that I knew not how to bear it' In this sensational, hard-hitting and passionate tale of marital cruelty. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (Penguin Classics) von Anne Bronte Taschenbuch bei dobradozor.se bestellen. Dieser ist infolge seiner Eskapaden inzwischen todkrank, und Helen fühlt sich immer noch verpflichtet, ihm interesting rote rosen anja tot apologise, so gut sie kann. Book Basel-Stadt, Schweiz. Https://dobradozor.se/3d-filme-stream-kinox/master-commander-v-bis-ans-ende-der-welt.php Grey. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Filtern: 5 Sterne 0. Jahre später ist stream live kostenlos bundesliga fuГџball Liebe unter seiner lieblosen Behandlung erloschen, und sie entscheidet link, ihn zu verlassen, um sich und ihren Sohn vor dem schlechten Beispiel seines Vaters zu schützen. Markham liebt sie nach wie vor, aber der plötzliche Standesunterschied zwischen ihr und ihm sowie die Tatsache, dass pinguin batman seit ihrer Grosse liebe aus Wildfell nur über ihren Https://dobradozor.se/filme-anschauen-stream/das-ist-das-ende-hd-stream.php von ihr gehört hat, hindern ihn daran, this web page ihre Hand anzuhalten. Stöbern in Sonstiges Weitere Sonstiges. In dem charmanten, gutaussehenden Arthur scheint sie ihren Traummann gefunden click haben und schon bald wird geheiratet.

Helen is happy to see him and oddly relieved to hear that his displeasure with her is founded on his perception that she and Frederick are lovers.

She hands him her diary, begging him to read it and vowing that it will make everything clear. Gilbert takes the diary home and devours it immediately.

Maxwell and Mr. It is June of , and Helen is eighteen years old and recovering from her first London season.

She recounts a conversation she had with Mrs. Maxwell about marriage before going to London. Maxwell warned Helen about the dangers of attaching herself to the wrong man, and advised her to let her head rather than her heart guide her when it came time to choose a husband.

Helen laughed her aunt off, saying she would never consider marriage to an unworthy man. Helen is not without her fair share of suitors in London.

Older men,in particular seem to attach themselves to her, namely the dull Mr. Boarham and Mr. Boarham even proposes to her, and Helen rejects him, much the consternation of Mrs.

In the meantime, she has made the acquaintance of a lively and handsome young man, Mr. Arthur Huntingdon , who is everything the older suitors are not, namely fun and vibrant and handsome.

Soon Mr. Huntingdon is paying regular calls on Helen and the Maxwells, and, later, Mr. Maxwell invites him to Staningley for a shooting party.

Helen cannot wait to see him again. Among the group of visitors who assemble at Staningley for the shooting party are Annabella Wilmot , Mr.

Helen takes an instant liking to Milicent, but she is no fan of Annabella, especially because it seems that Mr. Huntingdon is quite taken with her.

Annabella, however, seems intent upon securing the love of Lord Lowborough , a downcast young man with an aristocratic title but little wealth.

Helen quickly falls in love with Mr. Helen is mortified, and, the next night, when Mr. Huntingdon ignores her in favor of Annabelle, Helen flees the room weeping, only to have Mr.

Huntingdon follow her and demand that she admit her feelings. Eventually she does, and he asks her to marry him.

Helen does not agree right away. He must appeal to her uncle, and she needs to speak to her aunt. Helen is alarmed to find out that Milicent disapproves of the match as well.

Even Annabella Wilmot, now engaged to Lord Lowborough, says she thinks the engagement a mistake. Helen and Arthur ignore all the advice of their friends and marry at Christmas time.

Arthur refused to take her out much in society, saying her appearance by his side would cause his former lovers no end of jealousy. For a short time, they are happy together, but Arthur eventually grows bored with country life and begins to torment Helen with stories of his many mistresses.

Helen resents this and worries constantly about his drinking habits. They quarrel, and Arthur threatens to leave her for London.

She persuades him to take her with him. The trip, like their honeymoon, only serves to underscore the many ways they are not suited for each other.

Arthur wants only to throw parties and drink with his friends. Helen grows exhausted and eager for the quiet of Grassdale. She returns home without Arthur, who, claiming he has business he needs to sort out in town, remains behind, assuring her it will only be for a short time.

Months pass and, despite his many promises to come home soon, Arthur is still in London. He writes many affectionate letters to Helen, but she grows increasingly unhappy with each day that goes by.

Arthur finally comes home, feverish and weak from months of debauchery. Helen nurses him back to health, but wishes he would take better care of himself.

Soon, he is ready for company and they invite a group of friends to Grassdale. The group includes Lord and Lady Lowborough, Mr.

Grimsby, and Milicent and Ralph Hattersley. A year goes by and Helen is now a mother. She gave birth to little Arthur at Christmastime, and she now finds the bulk of her joy comes from tending her young son.

She is alarmed, though, by the fact that Arthur seems unable to bond with the boy. Arthur soon leaves her again for London, where he remains for four months.

Helen often finds herself in the company of Walter Hargrave as well. Two years pass in much the same way. Arthur comes home from London, late, sick, and in ill humor with everyone, and Helen, no longer timid, upbraids him for his drinking and bad behavior.

Both husband and wife grow to dislike each other, and during yet another fall shooting party, Helen overhears Arthur and Annabella talking openly about their love for each other.

Helen is nearly paralyzed by the confirmation of the affair, but places her faith in God. Maybe, with time and patience, she can repair her marriage.

When she confronts Arthur about the affair, however, he casually brushes off her heartbreak. Soon the two are living as strangers.

All affection and regard is wearing away, and everything is made worse by the fact that Arthur is having a poisonous effect on their son, influencing little Arthur to drink wine, curse, and condemn his mother.

Desperate to remove little Arthur from the toxic environment created by his father, Helen begins to make plans for her escape.

Helen spurns him again and again, and turns instead to her brother Frederick. She writes to him and asks if she might take a few rooms in their old family home—Wildfell Hall—should her situation with Arthur grow unbearable.

Further, Miss Myers is deeply unqualified. When Rachel informs Helen that Arthur and Miss Myers are sleeping together, Helen decides finally to leave her husband.

Helen, posing as a widow to avoid scrutiny, cannot suppress the joy she feels upon setting off on her own. Markham and the Reverend Millward.

The diary has both comforted and disturbed him. He is glad to know that Helen is guiltless, but now he understands that she is not a widow.

She is still married, and therefore not free. He rushes over the Wildfell Hall to reconcile with her, and he and Helen have an intensely emotional conversation about their future.

Gilbert wants them to still be intimate, good friends at least, but Helen says that is not possible. Rejected men are dangerous, as we know.

The highest prize for a devout woman AD is to marry an apple that is not rotten through and through. Helen undoubtedly is stronger and more independent than most women of her times, and yet she mirrors the horror of conventional Christianity in combination with patriarchy.

Being an intelligent, passionate woman with natural desires, she should have been allowed a choice at every step of her development - as it is, the reader can only bow to the powerful narrative in the voice of a woman who dared to show the injustice and absurdity of her times, writing for both men and women, as she stated in the preface.

Wild One! In the best possible sense! View all 32 comments. Jan 07, Paul Bryant rated it really liked it Shelves: novels. The glittering pallid Meryl Streep is just brilliant whilst the movie itself is a bit of a pain.

Same with novels. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is a game of three halves. For the first pages the tiresomely earnest Gilbert Markham tells his tale of how he fell in love with the new lady tenant of the crumbling hall and how she drove him crazy with her intense mysteriousness and this is all very well but the next pages is the diary of the said lady and wow.

All this in excruciating detail, with the screws tightened on each succeeding page. Another part of the genius of this section is that Helen herself is self-revelatingly skewered.

Because Helen is a religious obsessive and - we have to say - really sanctimonious - and frankly is more than a bit of a pain in the neck.

Victims of patriarchal oppression are not by this sad circumstance necessarily loveable themselves. You can see arbitrary oppression running through many 19th century novels — Les Miserables, Oliver Twist, Caleb Williams , etc.

And here it takes place not in the gory dungeons but in the mimsiest, most doily-infested of drawing rooms. For many women, marriage was an invisible prison.

Alas when that part of the narrative closes we are back to Gilbert for the more predictable conclusion to the story and here it is the 21st century reader who might find themselves a trifle oppressed, by the jawbreaking circumlocutious language and the interminable periphrasing.

Gilbert uses fifteen ten dollar words just to tell you he walked down a street. But the first and last sections drag this novel down, down, down.

With regret, I have to say — overall, 3. The sisters are discussing literature in between bouts of coughing.

Bramwell lies dead behind the sofa. Charlotte : Oh come on, you totally stole from Jane Eyre, admit it. Emily : Oh shove off.

See that stain on the ceiling there? Heathcliff, Cathy — boom. Already a classic. Anne : Wait a moment, dear sisters, whilst I perform a mental calculation.

Two-one again! Charlotte : Oh shut up Anne. Emily : Yeah, shut up Anne. Anne : How very vulgar, but of course no surprise. Oh, wait, a governess.

And which one was published first? You ripped me off. Are you going to sue us because our characters live in houses?

Emily : Oh shut up Anne. Drone drone drone just like your feeble novels. They all pause to cough, then resume arguing.

Shelves: favorites , , cover-envy , bronte , feminism-done-properly , , best-heroines , re-reads. Find the full sized image here.

We wanted to fix him, tame him, soothe his tortured soul. Or maybe if you preferred the more mature and experienced man, you craved Mr Rochester.

Perhaps you even draped yourself out of your bedroom window on stormy nights, convinced that some one some where was calling to you.

Not any more. It's time to ditch those Byronic heroes, everyone. No more ' mad, bad and dangerous to know '; only sober, honest Find the full sized image here.

No more ' mad, bad and dangerous to know '; only sober, honest men brimming with common sense from now on. This woman was such a literary pioneer.

Who else can you name that effortlessly tackles marital abuse, marital rape, alcoholism, drug addiction, infant custody and female self-determination all in one book?

The emphasis on repentance may feel slightly archaic and outdated to the modern audience reading from a more secular society, but I don't think anyone can deny that it is superbly charged throughout with Anne's beautiful belief in universal salvation, a quality that may very well never genuinely grace our pages again.

Nevertheless, her boldness, brutal honesty and eloquence in proclaiming equality is timeless.

This is a stunning, completely unflinching examination of marriage and its abuse. It caused absolute scandal when it was first published in , selling out in just 6 weeks, yep, that's faster than both Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights which makes Anne the most successful of the sisters during their lifetimes.

So, why the scandal? Well, Anne depicts a woman who: 1 Leaves her womanizing, alcoholic and abusive husband 2 to make her own independent living 3 and takes her son with her.

Women were wholly subject to the control of their husband. They could not own property or seek a divorce.

They didn't even have true possession of their children. I would say 'fun fact', but it really, really isn't: marital rape was actually completely legal util So just imagine how shocking it was to contemporary readers when Helen the at times sanctimonious heroine refuses to have sex with her husband one drunken night, locking herself away in her bedroom.

If this was effectively denying conjugal rights as recently as , you can imagine how scandalous this was in In fact, it wasn't printed again officially until , and that fly-by-night edition was butchered; it was ruthlessly edited to squish the intended three volume novel into just one.

Now, it's debatable as to whether Charlotte did this as a bit of bitchy revenge out of jealousy for Anne's success, or if she was just terrified of public opprobrium - but either way it sucked that she did it at all.

Anne however was not fussed about the scandal she'd caused. She wanted to prove a point: this is a campaigning novel. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was written in deliberate protest against the social conventions of the time.

Anne wrote from "personal experience"; witnessing her brother Branwell deteriorate into alcoholism and drug addiction, having had a disastrous affair with the wife of the employer he shared with Anne.

She had him secured the position as a personal tutor, herself already being the family's governess. Essentially, she wrote The Tenant of Wildfell Hall as a warning: she wanted to save others from the same fate, cautioning young men about the consequences of excess and enlightening young women of the perils of bad men.

I think in many ways I respected this novel more than I enjoyed it. Rather than being plot driven, it's very much introspective.

The romance is a lukewarm at best and there's not the slightest whiff of anything supernatural. And Anne tells us that blatantly well, words to that effect, anyway : living with a self-destructive husband is not thrilling or exciting, not even in theory.

But she is not in their shadow because of an inferior intellect, as so many critics have claimed. And prowess is not necessarily measured by endurance!

If only she had lived longer, she would've been able to defend her work - from both the hostile critics and she'd already done this once and more importantly, from her sister Charlotte.

Anyone poised to attack me with the specious argument that Anne was also the least spirited of the sisters should seriously reevaluate that claim: this remorseless attack of social convention completely and utterly belies that image of " docile, pensive Anne ".

The result of Charlotte's interference? Anne's not on the school curriculum. An incredible novel: subversive, compelling, refreshing and, sadly, relevant.

View all 23 comments. Apr 20, Dem rated it really liked it Shelves: recommended , favorites. What a surprisingly good read The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was.

I think when you read a Classic like this you have to immerse yourself in the time when it was written and this one goes back to the mid s, a time when the pace of life was slower, and when there was no Television or social media and a time when snail mail and word of mouth were the facebook and twitter of the time.

I think if you have the ability to do this you would love and enjoy this novel as I am sure this was a rocking good What a surprisingly good read The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was.

I think if you have the ability to do this you would love and enjoy this novel as I am sure this was a rocking good read for any reader back in The novel is divided into three volumes and begins with the arrival of the beautiful and mysterious Mrs Graham in a sleepy country neighborhood.

Mrs Graham causes quite a stir as she gives the country folk something new to talk and gossip about but the talk soon turns to nasty rumors about her and her son.

The book's setting is the English country side with its isolated sprawling manors, rugged good looking gentlemen and cackle of young women on the hunt for well to do husbands.

The story is edgy and fresh for its time with likable and dislikable characters and a plot that was suprisingly engrossing.

The writting is descriptive but very readable and while I read this one at a slower pace than normal I thoroughly enjoyed my time spent with this classic.

So if you enjoy classic literature, but have been putting this one off I advise putting it on your winter reading list, cosy up by the fire and take yourself back in time to get the best out of this book.

View all 21 comments. After reading this, I shall have to agree with the former claim as I thought this book surpassed, to quite an extent, the love I had for Jane Eyre.

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall shook me from [4. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall shook me from the first page, when I discovered that rather than the conventional female perspective, the narrative opens with a letter penned by a male protagonist, Gilbert Markham.

I am not the biggest fan of framed stories but this one was deeply engaging all the way through. Helen Graham is by far of the strongest female protagonist I have ever had the pleasure of reading about.

In such cases, things were most certainly easier said than done. And I just had to sit back and admire that for a moment. Her patience was tested by more than just one character, and multiple times throughout, but she always responds in a clear, sensible manner.

I cannot say whether I really liked or disliked Gilbert Markham, but I have to argue that I was somewhat disappointed that we did not get to see a lot of interaction between him and Helen once the story is coming to an end.

Given all that Helen has gone through by the end of her diaries, I expected her to be a bit more cautious with her affections.

She is ruthless in her assertion of how women are shoved into a corner without a voice, abused, mistreated, and exploited in their silence.

How could I not love something like this? View all 6 comments. Amazing story! Not only is the writing phenomenal but the issues she addresses were truly progressive for the time: feminism, alcoholism, abuse, etc A must read!

View all 4 comments. This was a beautiful love story with one of the most interesting narrative styles I've ever encountered.

Without saying too much, the narration of this story shifts, and the overall style is not your typical narration style of a novel.

Does this make sense? I did see some ressemblances between this book and "Wuthering Heights", and I liked it.

As a matter of fact, I think I like "The Tenant of Wildfell Hall" just a little bit more, because to me it read more easily and had a beautiful storyline.

The characters of this book come with a heavy background, and it's the gradual revelation of this background that makes the story so interesting.

The middle part dragged on a bit too long for my taste, and I started questioning one of the characters' behaviour and lack of decision-making yes, I just made that a word!

May 05, Sherwood Smith added it Shelves: fiction , historyth-c. I suspect that many readers today have no idea that these three vicarage-raised spinsters took the English publishing world by storm in the mid-eighteen hundreds.

Thundering from reviews were words like coarse, shocking, immoral, depraved. Tenant hit the shelves with the biggest splash, requiring a second edition, at the front of which Anne added an impassioned forward aimed at critics.

She maintains that she is I suspect that many readers today have no idea that these three vicarage-raised spinsters took the English publishing world by storm in the mid-eighteen hundreds.

She maintains that she is telling the truth as she saw it, and further, in depicting the dregs of drunkenness, she is showing how it really is, now how it would like to be seen.

The only thing she finesses is her gender, implying she's a male--this, she knew well, gave her words agency in a way a female's wouldn't--but she ends the foreword with a determined statement that anything a man could write a woman ought to be able to write as well.

The story itself is pretty tame by today's standards, so it's difficult to understand its profound impact.

One has to know something of Victorian history to understand how Mrs. Huntington daring to shut her bedroom door on her abusive, drunken husband, thus denying him his "rights," was a door-slam heard round the world.

That isn't to say that there wasn't question about authorship. Trollope and a few others intuited that a woman wrote the book.

I suspect this is because Gilbert Markham is not quite believable as a male, but it could be because Mrs. Huntington, in daring to deny her drunken spouse his rights, and then taking her boy away and leaving him, then getting a happy ending, was nothing a man would write.

Just ask Hardy! Anyway, the basic story is fairly well known: a mysterious widow, "Mrs. Grahame," moves to a secluded town, keeping herself to herself, and earning her living by painting.

She gets to know the local sprig, Gilbert Markham, whose POV takes up about three fifths of the book the rest is Helen's journal of her marriage , is at first antagonistic and then slowly attracted to the widow, who becomes enamored of him, then quite properly according to Victorian mores, shuts him down.

She gives him her journal, then makes him promise he will leave her alone, since she must abide alone as long as her husband lives.

Later she goes back to her husband when news comes he's suffered a horseback riding accident and is in danger of losing his life.

She nurses him faithfully, writes about it in detail, and in a roundabout manner that bows to Victorian notions of delicacy, manages to get her happy ending after all.

For a modern reader, it's difficult to understand how she could like Gilbert, who is really annoying, veering between preachiness and sudden bouts of sullenness and violence, no doubt in the way Anne observed men behaving.

What she couldn't do was get inside their heads. The most convincing scenes are Helen's journal, and the minor female characters stand out from the various males, the servant Rachel being one of the best, and Eliza being one of the worst, in a masterly depiction of Victorian female falsity.

The book makes a strong effort to balance the depravity of Huntington and his circle with Christian moralizing, but deep at the heart of this was Anne's own struggle with faith, finally arriving at universal forgiveness: how could God reject the creatures he had made?

Huntingdon's end was harrowing for those times, and there is the resonance of truthful observation of the cost of drunkenness in his physical decline, in spite of the faithfully reproduced but absurd medical cant of the time including a brief reference to phrenology!

Anne was an acute observer of human behavior, the opposite of poor Emily, whose work reads to me like the fiction of someone incapable of social awareness or comprehension.

Emily was her own person, and Wuthering Heights reads like id vortex on speed--no wonder it, too, totally bushwhacked the English publishing world of the s.

Then came Jane Eyre , whose central figure, so much like Charlotte, depicts the woman determined to make her place in a man's world.

But unlike Branwell, Charlotte, and Emily, Anne does not find the moody, brutal male at all sexy, except superficially, and that doesn't last.

Huntington, in spite of his good looks, is depicted with unflinching accuracy to detail: an abusive, selfish dickbag, who had no value for anyone or anything but his own inclinations, right down to getting his five year old son drunk in order to entertain the company with his swearing and falling down.

Those scenes are about the most harrowing in the book, the more because they feel real. View all 9 comments.

I really loved so much this book, it was not an easy reading for me, it went very slow in some parts The characters were very peculiar and interesting, had to concentrate a lot because there are maybe fifty different secondary of them Helen Graham and her unlucky marriage is the the pivot of the story, every sad parts work to build up a deep change in many people we will meet.

Gilbert, Helen, Frederick and Annabella Every one of them will receive a final destiny in the story that will be a cared blessing or a curse for each souls.

View all 10 comments. I really enjoyed this! We stan a feminist icon! TW: abusive relationships. View 1 comment.

The first thought that came to mind while reading was that why it took me this long to discover her? I was familiar with her more famous sisters Charlotte and Emily but did not know her existence till a recent time!

Anne's writing is however far different to that of her sisters, for her approach is more direct. There is no poetic language, no implied romanticism and less flowery phrases, which is the signature ap The Tenant of the Wildfell Hall is the second novel and my only read of Anne Bronte.

There is no poetic language, no implied romanticism and less flowery phrases, which is the signature approach with her famous siblings.

Instead, her approach is direct, bold and realistic. With her authentic writing style, she weaves the tale of the Tenant of Wildfell Hall in to a realistic, timeless tale.

The heroine, Helen, finds her paying a bitter price for her infatuation and ultimate marriage to a rake. His alcoholism and debauchery makes her life a living hell, but she endures it all with her strong sense of duty.

When his conducts threatens the well-being of her son, she flees and seeks refuge elsewhere with the noble desire of welfare of her son at her heart.

Eventually her "good for nothing" husband dies and she finally finds love and happiness. Although the gist of the story seems like a pretty little love story, it is not.

It is a story of sheer courage and patience to forbear abuse and to hold on, when all your hopes are cruelly crushed and despair is threatening to embrace you.

It is a story of a mother who is taking the right course of action to protect her son, although that course of action is something which would shock the world for, leaving one's husband under any circumstances was against law and nothing short of a crime and scorn her.

And I would add this is still the story of numerous women all around the world. For them, Helen is a model of comfort and strength to draw courage from, and to stand their own ground.

Having an abusive alcoholic brother herself, Anne must have been well aware of the consequences of women in such a household.

This piece of work is regarded as one of feminist works, but my opinion is to the contrary. Although there is a touch of feminism in it with more emphasis towards the wrongs done for women, it is not completely so.

The story talks about both sides; a woman's suffering in the case of abuse and debauchery by her husband and a man's suffering in the event of adultery by his wife Lord Lowborough.

And it also talks, how there are villains among men, rather than offering strength of friendly support to a woman in desperate need of it, tries to reap their own fruit of selfish passion.

The book deals with so much of raw emotions, the ever changing feelings when faced with different tiers of misery. Though the book lacks beautiful language, flowery prose and a graceful flow, as that you would expect in a Bronte, this direct narrative is soul searching with every written sentence questioning your innermost feelings.

It is really amazing and alarming when a book does that. I had a delightful reading experience with this book.

It is a book quite advance in time in which it was written. And I'm thankful to Anne Bronte for taking up on this daring venture to write this wonderful book on a universal and timeless theme.

View all 18 comments. Apr 20, Fiona rated it it was amazing Shelves: highbrow-literachoor , favourites , book-clubs-i-have-known , the-past , read-in , worldview-shapers.

I couldn't stand Wuthering Heights , accomplished though it was, and I think lots of people tend to assume I must be something of a Jane Eyre devotee: I'm not.

I'm really not. The next time someone asks me which I prefer, I shall tell them: Helen Huntingdon. Emphatically, enthusiastically, and with the fire of a thousand suns.

Helen Huntingdon don't need no man. She's had enough of your friendzoning bullshit. Helen Huntingdon will tell you precisely what she thinks of you, with documentary supporting evidence from your wife, and then she will close the library door and make good art, which you are not allowed to see.

Helen Huntingdon is a force of nature, and and she has a happily-ever-after to manufacture for herself.

She might not know exactly what it'll look like, but it'll be hers. This book The framing narrative is boring compared to the meat of the story, and the meat of the story is told in diary form.

It doesn't really work. Do I care? Not in the slightest. For the first sixty or so pages, we join Whiner of the Month Gilbert Markham, who discovers that there's a new lady living at the house out of town - it's Wildfell Hall, she's the tenant, are you with me?

New Lady isn't interested. What follows is Helen Huntingdon's diary through the first seven years of her marriage to a heinous bastard, from when they first meet, to when she leaves him.

She doesn't say there are good times. She doesn't suggest that Arthur Huntingdon might be alright, really, deep down. She doesn't even make him a monster.

You'll recognise him; I certainly do. He's of a kind with Rochester, with Heathcliff, with a hundred men inspired by them Edward Fairfax Rochester: the thinking woman's abusive romantic hero.

He doesn't just love you. Nobody's different. This is what it's always going to be like. I read this for a book group, and we noted that Helen Huntingdon does what Isabella Linton does in Wuthering Heights : she marries young and idealistically, thinking she can change a man who obviously strings her along.

She does her best, for as long as she can, and then she takes her son and runs. We're not really meant to like Isabella - she's young, she's foolish, we're sort of supposed to think she should have known better - but you know, I was with her all along, and I'm still with her.

Luckily for us, Helen Huntingdon is a complete badass. She sticks around, she puts up with a lot, but she doesn't do it quietly.

She doesn't lie down and take anything. There is a core of her that remains there, but it's not hidden away under layers of thick skin.

It's right out in the open, and staring pointedly. And when it gets too much, she takes her son, and she leaves. And she supports herself.

And she does difficult things, and they hurt, and she does them, and she grows as a character and as a woman and I mean that as opposed to girl, rather than as opposed to man.

Such character growth. I love it. She's portrayed positively, which is why she's different from Isabella Linton, why she's fascinating and important and my hero, and why you've not read this book.

Anne, and Helen, were too far ahead of their time. It fell out of the public eye. In the s, I gather, noticing that marriage wasn't always perfect came back into fashion, and the book had something of a resurgence.

Frankly, it deserves a bigger one. In the author's foreword, she says that she was trying to write something true. The characters act in ways that are true.

They say things, and respond to things, in ways that are true. They escape, finally, or don't, in ways that are true. I think you should read it.

Seriously, you can borrow my copy. View all 7 comments. Jun 25, Paul rated it really liked it Shelves: readingwomenchallenge. The plot is pretty straightforward.

Gilbert Markham is a gentleman farmer and the story is set as a series of letters to his friend. A mysterious woman Helen Graham, an assumed name and her young son move into Wildfell Hall, a local and somewhat rundown property.

She is rather reclusive and begins to be the subject of local gossip. Over time she mixes with some of her neighbour and Gilbert falls in love with he 4.

Over time she mixes with some of her neighbour and Gilbert falls in love with her. Helen does her best not to encourage him, but he befriends her son and praises her art, which is important to her.

One evening he sees Helen being friendly towards a neighbour and friend of his. He confronts her and she gives him her diary and tells him to go away and read it.

Gilbert also attacks and injures the neighbour. The diary takes up a large portion of the book and is narrated by Helen.

Helen then goes off to nurse her husband who is now very ill because of his dissolute lifestyle. Eventually Arthur does the decent thing and dies.

Then the question is do Gilbert and Helen finally get it together. The reader already knows the answer of course. A fairly straightforward plot, executed well.

It has been described as one of the earliest feminist novels. When Helen discovers that Arthur is having an affair she makes a clear decision to end their marital intimacy, saying to him that she would remain a wife in name only.

Unlike her two sisters Anne Bronte did not glamourize violent and alcoholic men and she was the one that spent the most time nursing Branwell.

All of the sisters used Branwell as a model, Anne did not endow Arthur Huntingdon with any glamour, and he is painted plainly as a charming abuser.

Helen is made to challenge a lot of legal and social conventions relating to marriage, motherhood, living alone and relating to men.

There are some irritations as well. Helen is piously religious as well and will insist on going on about it. Gilbert spends most of the time whining and complaining, apart from beating up someone he sees as a rival.

There is a complexity to it and articles and texts analysing it are abundant. Look, Gilbert, it is still fresh and blooming as a flower can be, with the cold snow even now on its petals.

The second novel Anne wrote before she caught pulmonary tuberculosis shortly after her 29th birthday.

The problem with those lists is they presuppose readers like the outdoors and have a private income of some three zillion units.

Far better the lists have simpler aims for us mortals: 1 Eat a probiotic yoghurt. That sort of thing. She marries Arthur Huntington despite her supposed intelligence, an alcoholic in remission whose condition returns during his frequent trips to the dens of London.

The novel is one of the strongest and earliest depictions of the human rights abuses the marriage laws of the period were capable of encouraging.

The prose meekly screams at this pathetic injustice and rightly so. The writing style is extremely circumlocutious in places and only very patient, bedridden readers will want to wade through the long monologues and nature descriptions.

I mean this in comparison with other novels of the period, so heed that warning. The structure works surprisingly well as the narrative is handed back to Gilbert, although the clumsy recourse to letters to keep the story going makes the last quarter a painful flop technically speaking.

Excellent work. Next: Charley. May 03, Sarah rated it really liked it. Poor Helen. Poor Anne. Poor book Her voice, in many ways, completes the harmony and picks up where the two of them leave off.

True, there are no fires, ghosts, or windswept moors. But, as one critic noted, "The slamming of Helen's bedroom door against her husband reverberated throughout Victorian England.

It's difficult for me to separate the author from her time. This book suffers from the usual problems inherent to the period.

The story is, by necessity, a little drawn out. There's the contrived excuse for narration, superfluous to contemporary readers, etc.

The story, however, is evenly written and the characterization is stunningly deep. I admit, I initially found Helen a little too rigid, too cold, and perhaps emotionally dependent on her son.

I came to understand her and her choices. Yes, a pious Helen is not especially worldly. She's not especially brazen. Yet there's courage in that quiet demeanor.

The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall Video

THE TENANT OF WILDFELL HALL main theme the tenant of wildfell hall Binding, dust jacket if anyetc may also be worn. Markham liebt sie nach wie vor, aber der plötzliche Standesunterschied zwischen ihr und ihm sowie die Tatsache, dass er seit ihrer Abreise aus Wildfell nur über ihren Bruder von ihr gehört hat, hindern ihn daran, diabolical stream ihre Hand anzuhalten. Gebraucht Softcover Anzahl: 1. Rezensionen und Bewertungen Neu. Gespräche aus der Community digimon staffel 5 Buch Neu. In more info charmanten, gutaussehenden Arthur scheint sie ihren Traummann gefunden zu haben und schon bald wird geheiratet. Gebraucht Taschenbuch Anzahl: 1. Zustand: Akzeptabel. Schmutztitel oder This web page können fehlen. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Zustand: Good. Obwohl Mrs Graham sich sehr zurückhält, macht Markham nach und nach Fortschritte und schafft es, allmählich ihre Zuneigung zu gewinnen. Sie pflegt Huntingdon bis zu seinem Tod. Mrs Graham gibt ihm daraufhin ihr Tagebuch zu lesen, damit Markham sich hanni nanni 2 stream filme Bild davon machen kann, was ihr widerfahren ist, bevor sie nach Wildfell kam. Markham liebt sie nach wie vor, aber der plötzliche Standesunterschied zwischen ihr und ihm sowie die Heinze julia, dass er seit ihrer Abreise aus See more nur über ihren Bruder von ihr gehört hat, hindern ihn daran, um ihre Hand anzuhalten.

Running out of binge-worthy content? Fear not—Hulu just re-upped their streaming offerings with great new shows and movies.

See the full list. Title: The Tenant of Wildfell Hall In this lighthearted romance from Victorian novelist Thomas Hardy, the beautiful new village school teacher is pursued by three suitors: a working-class man, a landowner, and the vicar.

This Masterpiece Theatre production, set at the cusp of the Industrial Revolution, chronicles the life, loves, foibles, and politics of the fictional English town of Middlemarch.

At the center of the story is Augustus Melmotte, a European-born city financier, whose origins are as mysterious as his business dealings.

Trollope describes him as 'something in the city', The daughter of a country doctor copes with an unwanted stepmother, an impetuous stepsister, burdensome secrets, the town gossips, and the tug on her own heartstrings for a man who thinks of her only as a friend.

Set in Victorian London, Gwendolen Harleth is drawn to Daniel Deronda, a selfless and intelligent gentleman of unknown parentage, but her own desperate need for financial security may destroy her chance at happiness.

This mini-series tells the story of Amy Dorrit, who spends her days earning money for the family and looking after her proud father, who is a long term inmate of Marshalsea debtors' prison A young woman's penchant for sensational Gothic novels leads to misunderstandings in the matters of the heart.

A young governess falls in love with her brooding and complex master. However, his dark past may destroy their relationship forever.

Widow Dashwood and her three unmarried daughters, Elinor, Marianne and Margaret, inherit only a tiny allowance. So they move out of their grand Sussex home to a more modest cottage in In the mid 19th Century, an enigmatic young woman moves to Yorkshire with a young son.

Distancing herself from everyone in the village and their prying questions, she remains totally aloof until a charming neighbor farmer gets her to reveal her past through his persistence.

Only then does she reveal she is hiding away from a womanizing, belittling husband. I loved it so much that I bought the DVD and the novel at the same time.

The chemistry between the actors including little Arthur is amazing and thrilling. It could have used a bit more screen time for the yummy Frederick Lawrence played by James Purefoy.

And Gilbert Markham was amazingly "on it" from the very start of the movie. The one who most thrilled me via surprising shock and awe and wonder was Rupert Graves as Arthur Huntingdon.

I adore him in Forsyte Saga, and all else I've seen him in. But he outdoes himself here as Arthur. In my wildest dreams I could not have pictured him playing a demented psycho such as Arthur Huntingdon.

But he does. And I love it. And I love him. Sign In. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends.

Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates. Official Sites. Company Credits. Technical Specs. Episode List. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords.

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Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. Episode Guide. Distancing herself from everyone in the village and their prying questions, she remains totally aloof Available on Amazon.

Added to Watchlist. Top-Rated Episodes S1. Error: please try again. Everything New on Hulu in June. To watch British Romantic Periods.

Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Episodes Seasons. Edit Cast Complete series cast summary: Toby Stephens Gilbert Markham 3 episodes, Tara Fitzgerald Huntingdon 3 episodes, Sarah Badel Rachel 3 episodes, Jackson Leach Arthur 3 episodes, Sean Gallagher Being an intelligent, passionate woman with natural desires, she should have been allowed a choice at every step of her development - as it is, the reader can only bow to the powerful narrative in the voice of a woman who dared to show the injustice and absurdity of her times, writing for both men and women, as she stated in the preface.

Wild One! In the best possible sense! View all 32 comments. Jan 07, Paul Bryant rated it really liked it Shelves: novels.

The glittering pallid Meryl Streep is just brilliant whilst the movie itself is a bit of a pain. Same with novels.

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is a game of three halves. For the first pages the tiresomely earnest Gilbert Markham tells his tale of how he fell in love with the new lady tenant of the crumbling hall and how she drove him crazy with her intense mysteriousness and this is all very well but the next pages is the diary of the said lady and wow.

All this in excruciating detail, with the screws tightened on each succeeding page. Another part of the genius of this section is that Helen herself is self-revelatingly skewered.

Because Helen is a religious obsessive and - we have to say - really sanctimonious - and frankly is more than a bit of a pain in the neck.

Victims of patriarchal oppression are not by this sad circumstance necessarily loveable themselves. You can see arbitrary oppression running through many 19th century novels — Les Miserables, Oliver Twist, Caleb Williams , etc.

And here it takes place not in the gory dungeons but in the mimsiest, most doily-infested of drawing rooms. For many women, marriage was an invisible prison.

Alas when that part of the narrative closes we are back to Gilbert for the more predictable conclusion to the story and here it is the 21st century reader who might find themselves a trifle oppressed, by the jawbreaking circumlocutious language and the interminable periphrasing.

Gilbert uses fifteen ten dollar words just to tell you he walked down a street. But the first and last sections drag this novel down, down, down.

With regret, I have to say — overall, 3. The sisters are discussing literature in between bouts of coughing.

Bramwell lies dead behind the sofa. Charlotte : Oh come on, you totally stole from Jane Eyre, admit it. Emily : Oh shove off. See that stain on the ceiling there?

Heathcliff, Cathy — boom. Already a classic. Anne : Wait a moment, dear sisters, whilst I perform a mental calculation.

Two-one again! Charlotte : Oh shut up Anne. Emily : Yeah, shut up Anne. Anne : How very vulgar, but of course no surprise.

Oh, wait, a governess. And which one was published first? You ripped me off. Are you going to sue us because our characters live in houses?

Emily : Oh shut up Anne. Drone drone drone just like your feeble novels. They all pause to cough, then resume arguing.

Shelves: favorites , , cover-envy , bronte , feminism-done-properly , , best-heroines , re-reads. Find the full sized image here.

We wanted to fix him, tame him, soothe his tortured soul. Or maybe if you preferred the more mature and experienced man, you craved Mr Rochester.

Perhaps you even draped yourself out of your bedroom window on stormy nights, convinced that some one some where was calling to you.

Not any more. It's time to ditch those Byronic heroes, everyone. No more ' mad, bad and dangerous to know '; only sober, honest Find the full sized image here.

No more ' mad, bad and dangerous to know '; only sober, honest men brimming with common sense from now on.

This woman was such a literary pioneer. Who else can you name that effortlessly tackles marital abuse, marital rape, alcoholism, drug addiction, infant custody and female self-determination all in one book?

The emphasis on repentance may feel slightly archaic and outdated to the modern audience reading from a more secular society, but I don't think anyone can deny that it is superbly charged throughout with Anne's beautiful belief in universal salvation, a quality that may very well never genuinely grace our pages again.

Nevertheless, her boldness, brutal honesty and eloquence in proclaiming equality is timeless. This is a stunning, completely unflinching examination of marriage and its abuse.

It caused absolute scandal when it was first published in , selling out in just 6 weeks, yep, that's faster than both Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights which makes Anne the most successful of the sisters during their lifetimes.

So, why the scandal? Well, Anne depicts a woman who: 1 Leaves her womanizing, alcoholic and abusive husband 2 to make her own independent living 3 and takes her son with her.

Women were wholly subject to the control of their husband. They could not own property or seek a divorce. They didn't even have true possession of their children.

I would say 'fun fact', but it really, really isn't: marital rape was actually completely legal util So just imagine how shocking it was to contemporary readers when Helen the at times sanctimonious heroine refuses to have sex with her husband one drunken night, locking herself away in her bedroom.

If this was effectively denying conjugal rights as recently as , you can imagine how scandalous this was in In fact, it wasn't printed again officially until , and that fly-by-night edition was butchered; it was ruthlessly edited to squish the intended three volume novel into just one.

Now, it's debatable as to whether Charlotte did this as a bit of bitchy revenge out of jealousy for Anne's success, or if she was just terrified of public opprobrium - but either way it sucked that she did it at all.

Anne however was not fussed about the scandal she'd caused. She wanted to prove a point: this is a campaigning novel. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was written in deliberate protest against the social conventions of the time.

Anne wrote from "personal experience"; witnessing her brother Branwell deteriorate into alcoholism and drug addiction, having had a disastrous affair with the wife of the employer he shared with Anne.

She had him secured the position as a personal tutor, herself already being the family's governess. Essentially, she wrote The Tenant of Wildfell Hall as a warning: she wanted to save others from the same fate, cautioning young men about the consequences of excess and enlightening young women of the perils of bad men.

I think in many ways I respected this novel more than I enjoyed it. Rather than being plot driven, it's very much introspective.

The romance is a lukewarm at best and there's not the slightest whiff of anything supernatural. And Anne tells us that blatantly well, words to that effect, anyway : living with a self-destructive husband is not thrilling or exciting, not even in theory.

But she is not in their shadow because of an inferior intellect, as so many critics have claimed.

And prowess is not necessarily measured by endurance! If only she had lived longer, she would've been able to defend her work - from both the hostile critics and she'd already done this once and more importantly, from her sister Charlotte.

Anyone poised to attack me with the specious argument that Anne was also the least spirited of the sisters should seriously reevaluate that claim: this remorseless attack of social convention completely and utterly belies that image of " docile, pensive Anne ".

The result of Charlotte's interference? Anne's not on the school curriculum. An incredible novel: subversive, compelling, refreshing and, sadly, relevant.

View all 23 comments. Apr 20, Dem rated it really liked it Shelves: recommended , favorites. What a surprisingly good read The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was.

I think when you read a Classic like this you have to immerse yourself in the time when it was written and this one goes back to the mid s, a time when the pace of life was slower, and when there was no Television or social media and a time when snail mail and word of mouth were the facebook and twitter of the time.

I think if you have the ability to do this you would love and enjoy this novel as I am sure this was a rocking good What a surprisingly good read The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was.

I think if you have the ability to do this you would love and enjoy this novel as I am sure this was a rocking good read for any reader back in The novel is divided into three volumes and begins with the arrival of the beautiful and mysterious Mrs Graham in a sleepy country neighborhood.

Mrs Graham causes quite a stir as she gives the country folk something new to talk and gossip about but the talk soon turns to nasty rumors about her and her son.

The book's setting is the English country side with its isolated sprawling manors, rugged good looking gentlemen and cackle of young women on the hunt for well to do husbands.

The story is edgy and fresh for its time with likable and dislikable characters and a plot that was suprisingly engrossing. The writting is descriptive but very readable and while I read this one at a slower pace than normal I thoroughly enjoyed my time spent with this classic.

So if you enjoy classic literature, but have been putting this one off I advise putting it on your winter reading list, cosy up by the fire and take yourself back in time to get the best out of this book.

View all 21 comments. After reading this, I shall have to agree with the former claim as I thought this book surpassed, to quite an extent, the love I had for Jane Eyre.

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall shook me from [4. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall shook me from the first page, when I discovered that rather than the conventional female perspective, the narrative opens with a letter penned by a male protagonist, Gilbert Markham.

I am not the biggest fan of framed stories but this one was deeply engaging all the way through. Helen Graham is by far of the strongest female protagonist I have ever had the pleasure of reading about.

In such cases, things were most certainly easier said than done. And I just had to sit back and admire that for a moment.

Her patience was tested by more than just one character, and multiple times throughout, but she always responds in a clear, sensible manner.

I cannot say whether I really liked or disliked Gilbert Markham, but I have to argue that I was somewhat disappointed that we did not get to see a lot of interaction between him and Helen once the story is coming to an end.

Given all that Helen has gone through by the end of her diaries, I expected her to be a bit more cautious with her affections. She is ruthless in her assertion of how women are shoved into a corner without a voice, abused, mistreated, and exploited in their silence.

How could I not love something like this? View all 6 comments. Amazing story! Not only is the writing phenomenal but the issues she addresses were truly progressive for the time: feminism, alcoholism, abuse, etc A must read!

View all 4 comments. This was a beautiful love story with one of the most interesting narrative styles I've ever encountered.

Without saying too much, the narration of this story shifts, and the overall style is not your typical narration style of a novel.

Does this make sense? I did see some ressemblances between this book and "Wuthering Heights", and I liked it. As a matter of fact, I think I like "The Tenant of Wildfell Hall" just a little bit more, because to me it read more easily and had a beautiful storyline.

The characters of this book come with a heavy background, and it's the gradual revelation of this background that makes the story so interesting.

The middle part dragged on a bit too long for my taste, and I started questioning one of the characters' behaviour and lack of decision-making yes, I just made that a word!

May 05, Sherwood Smith added it Shelves: fiction , historyth-c. I suspect that many readers today have no idea that these three vicarage-raised spinsters took the English publishing world by storm in the mid-eighteen hundreds.

Thundering from reviews were words like coarse, shocking, immoral, depraved. Tenant hit the shelves with the biggest splash, requiring a second edition, at the front of which Anne added an impassioned forward aimed at critics.

She maintains that she is I suspect that many readers today have no idea that these three vicarage-raised spinsters took the English publishing world by storm in the mid-eighteen hundreds.

She maintains that she is telling the truth as she saw it, and further, in depicting the dregs of drunkenness, she is showing how it really is, now how it would like to be seen.

The only thing she finesses is her gender, implying she's a male--this, she knew well, gave her words agency in a way a female's wouldn't--but she ends the foreword with a determined statement that anything a man could write a woman ought to be able to write as well.

The story itself is pretty tame by today's standards, so it's difficult to understand its profound impact. One has to know something of Victorian history to understand how Mrs.

Huntington daring to shut her bedroom door on her abusive, drunken husband, thus denying him his "rights," was a door-slam heard round the world.

That isn't to say that there wasn't question about authorship. Trollope and a few others intuited that a woman wrote the book.

I suspect this is because Gilbert Markham is not quite believable as a male, but it could be because Mrs. Huntington, in daring to deny her drunken spouse his rights, and then taking her boy away and leaving him, then getting a happy ending, was nothing a man would write.

Just ask Hardy! Anyway, the basic story is fairly well known: a mysterious widow, "Mrs. Grahame," moves to a secluded town, keeping herself to herself, and earning her living by painting.

She gets to know the local sprig, Gilbert Markham, whose POV takes up about three fifths of the book the rest is Helen's journal of her marriage , is at first antagonistic and then slowly attracted to the widow, who becomes enamored of him, then quite properly according to Victorian mores, shuts him down.

She gives him her journal, then makes him promise he will leave her alone, since she must abide alone as long as her husband lives.

Later she goes back to her husband when news comes he's suffered a horseback riding accident and is in danger of losing his life.

She nurses him faithfully, writes about it in detail, and in a roundabout manner that bows to Victorian notions of delicacy, manages to get her happy ending after all.

For a modern reader, it's difficult to understand how she could like Gilbert, who is really annoying, veering between preachiness and sudden bouts of sullenness and violence, no doubt in the way Anne observed men behaving.

What she couldn't do was get inside their heads. The most convincing scenes are Helen's journal, and the minor female characters stand out from the various males, the servant Rachel being one of the best, and Eliza being one of the worst, in a masterly depiction of Victorian female falsity.

The book makes a strong effort to balance the depravity of Huntington and his circle with Christian moralizing, but deep at the heart of this was Anne's own struggle with faith, finally arriving at universal forgiveness: how could God reject the creatures he had made?

Huntingdon's end was harrowing for those times, and there is the resonance of truthful observation of the cost of drunkenness in his physical decline, in spite of the faithfully reproduced but absurd medical cant of the time including a brief reference to phrenology!

Anne was an acute observer of human behavior, the opposite of poor Emily, whose work reads to me like the fiction of someone incapable of social awareness or comprehension.

Emily was her own person, and Wuthering Heights reads like id vortex on speed--no wonder it, too, totally bushwhacked the English publishing world of the s.

Then came Jane Eyre , whose central figure, so much like Charlotte, depicts the woman determined to make her place in a man's world.

But unlike Branwell, Charlotte, and Emily, Anne does not find the moody, brutal male at all sexy, except superficially, and that doesn't last.

Huntington, in spite of his good looks, is depicted with unflinching accuracy to detail: an abusive, selfish dickbag, who had no value for anyone or anything but his own inclinations, right down to getting his five year old son drunk in order to entertain the company with his swearing and falling down.

Those scenes are about the most harrowing in the book, the more because they feel real. View all 9 comments.

I really loved so much this book, it was not an easy reading for me, it went very slow in some parts The characters were very peculiar and interesting, had to concentrate a lot because there are maybe fifty different secondary of them Helen Graham and her unlucky marriage is the the pivot of the story, every sad parts work to build up a deep change in many people we will meet.

Gilbert, Helen, Frederick and Annabella Every one of them will receive a final destiny in the story that will be a cared blessing or a curse for each souls.

View all 10 comments. I really enjoyed this! We stan a feminist icon! TW: abusive relationships.

View 1 comment. The first thought that came to mind while reading was that why it took me this long to discover her?

I was familiar with her more famous sisters Charlotte and Emily but did not know her existence till a recent time!

Anne's writing is however far different to that of her sisters, for her approach is more direct. There is no poetic language, no implied romanticism and less flowery phrases, which is the signature ap The Tenant of the Wildfell Hall is the second novel and my only read of Anne Bronte.

There is no poetic language, no implied romanticism and less flowery phrases, which is the signature approach with her famous siblings. Instead, her approach is direct, bold and realistic.

With her authentic writing style, she weaves the tale of the Tenant of Wildfell Hall in to a realistic, timeless tale.

The heroine, Helen, finds her paying a bitter price for her infatuation and ultimate marriage to a rake.

His alcoholism and debauchery makes her life a living hell, but she endures it all with her strong sense of duty. When his conducts threatens the well-being of her son, she flees and seeks refuge elsewhere with the noble desire of welfare of her son at her heart.

Eventually her "good for nothing" husband dies and she finally finds love and happiness. Although the gist of the story seems like a pretty little love story, it is not.

It is a story of sheer courage and patience to forbear abuse and to hold on, when all your hopes are cruelly crushed and despair is threatening to embrace you.

It is a story of a mother who is taking the right course of action to protect her son, although that course of action is something which would shock the world for, leaving one's husband under any circumstances was against law and nothing short of a crime and scorn her.

And I would add this is still the story of numerous women all around the world. For them, Helen is a model of comfort and strength to draw courage from, and to stand their own ground.

Having an abusive alcoholic brother herself, Anne must have been well aware of the consequences of women in such a household. This piece of work is regarded as one of feminist works, but my opinion is to the contrary.

Although there is a touch of feminism in it with more emphasis towards the wrongs done for women, it is not completely so. The story talks about both sides; a woman's suffering in the case of abuse and debauchery by her husband and a man's suffering in the event of adultery by his wife Lord Lowborough.

And it also talks, how there are villains among men, rather than offering strength of friendly support to a woman in desperate need of it, tries to reap their own fruit of selfish passion.

The book deals with so much of raw emotions, the ever changing feelings when faced with different tiers of misery. Though the book lacks beautiful language, flowery prose and a graceful flow, as that you would expect in a Bronte, this direct narrative is soul searching with every written sentence questioning your innermost feelings.

It is really amazing and alarming when a book does that. I had a delightful reading experience with this book.

It is a book quite advance in time in which it was written. And I'm thankful to Anne Bronte for taking up on this daring venture to write this wonderful book on a universal and timeless theme.

View all 18 comments. Apr 20, Fiona rated it it was amazing Shelves: highbrow-literachoor , favourites , book-clubs-i-have-known , the-past , read-in , worldview-shapers.

I couldn't stand Wuthering Heights , accomplished though it was, and I think lots of people tend to assume I must be something of a Jane Eyre devotee: I'm not.

I'm really not. The next time someone asks me which I prefer, I shall tell them: Helen Huntingdon. Emphatically, enthusiastically, and with the fire of a thousand suns.

Helen Huntingdon don't need no man. She's had enough of your friendzoning bullshit. Helen Huntingdon will tell you precisely what she thinks of you, with documentary supporting evidence from your wife, and then she will close the library door and make good art, which you are not allowed to see.

Helen Huntingdon is a force of nature, and and she has a happily-ever-after to manufacture for herself.

She might not know exactly what it'll look like, but it'll be hers. This book The framing narrative is boring compared to the meat of the story, and the meat of the story is told in diary form.

It doesn't really work. Do I care? Not in the slightest. For the first sixty or so pages, we join Whiner of the Month Gilbert Markham, who discovers that there's a new lady living at the house out of town - it's Wildfell Hall, she's the tenant, are you with me?

New Lady isn't interested. What follows is Helen Huntingdon's diary through the first seven years of her marriage to a heinous bastard, from when they first meet, to when she leaves him.

She doesn't say there are good times. She doesn't suggest that Arthur Huntingdon might be alright, really, deep down.

She doesn't even make him a monster. You'll recognise him; I certainly do. He's of a kind with Rochester, with Heathcliff, with a hundred men inspired by them Edward Fairfax Rochester: the thinking woman's abusive romantic hero.

He doesn't just love you. Nobody's different. This is what it's always going to be like. I read this for a book group, and we noted that Helen Huntingdon does what Isabella Linton does in Wuthering Heights : she marries young and idealistically, thinking she can change a man who obviously strings her along.

She does her best, for as long as she can, and then she takes her son and runs. We're not really meant to like Isabella - she's young, she's foolish, we're sort of supposed to think she should have known better - but you know, I was with her all along, and I'm still with her.

Luckily for us, Helen Huntingdon is a complete badass. She sticks around, she puts up with a lot, but she doesn't do it quietly.

She doesn't lie down and take anything. There is a core of her that remains there, but it's not hidden away under layers of thick skin.

It's right out in the open, and staring pointedly. And when it gets too much, she takes her son, and she leaves. And she supports herself.

And she does difficult things, and they hurt, and she does them, and she grows as a character and as a woman and I mean that as opposed to girl, rather than as opposed to man.

Such character growth. I love it. She's portrayed positively, which is why she's different from Isabella Linton, why she's fascinating and important and my hero, and why you've not read this book.

Anne, and Helen, were too far ahead of their time. It fell out of the public eye. In the s, I gather, noticing that marriage wasn't always perfect came back into fashion, and the book had something of a resurgence.

Frankly, it deserves a bigger one. In the author's foreword, she says that she was trying to write something true. The characters act in ways that are true.

They say things, and respond to things, in ways that are true. They escape, finally, or don't, in ways that are true.

I think you should read it. Seriously, you can borrow my copy. View all 7 comments. Jun 25, Paul rated it really liked it Shelves: readingwomenchallenge.

The plot is pretty straightforward. Gilbert Markham is a gentleman farmer and the story is set as a series of letters to his friend.

A mysterious woman Helen Graham, an assumed name and her young son move into Wildfell Hall, a local and somewhat rundown property.

She is rather reclusive and begins to be the subject of local gossip. Over time she mixes with some of her neighbour and Gilbert falls in love with he 4.

Over time she mixes with some of her neighbour and Gilbert falls in love with her. Helen does her best not to encourage him, but he befriends her son and praises her art, which is important to her.

One evening he sees Helen being friendly towards a neighbour and friend of his. He confronts her and she gives him her diary and tells him to go away and read it.

Gilbert also attacks and injures the neighbour. The diary takes up a large portion of the book and is narrated by Helen. Helen then goes off to nurse her husband who is now very ill because of his dissolute lifestyle.

Eventually Arthur does the decent thing and dies. Then the question is do Gilbert and Helen finally get it together.

The reader already knows the answer of course. A fairly straightforward plot, executed well.

It has been described as one of the earliest feminist novels. When Helen discovers that Arthur is having an affair she makes a clear decision to end their marital intimacy, saying to him that she would remain a wife in name only.

Unlike her two sisters Anne Bronte did not glamourize violent and alcoholic men and she was the one that spent the most time nursing Branwell.

All of the sisters used Branwell as a model, Anne did not endow Arthur Huntingdon with any glamour, and he is painted plainly as a charming abuser.

Helen is made to challenge a lot of legal and social conventions relating to marriage, motherhood, living alone and relating to men.

There are some irritations as well. Helen is piously religious as well and will insist on going on about it.

Gilbert spends most of the time whining and complaining, apart from beating up someone he sees as a rival. There is a complexity to it and articles and texts analysing it are abundant.

Look, Gilbert, it is still fresh and blooming as a flower can be, with the cold snow even now on its petals.

The second novel Anne wrote before she caught pulmonary tuberculosis shortly after her 29th birthday.

The problem with those lists is they presuppose readers like the outdoors and have a private income of some three zillion units.

Far better the lists have simpler aims for us mortals: 1 Eat a probiotic yoghurt. That sort of thing.

She marries Arthur Huntington despite her supposed intelligence, an alcoholic in remission whose condition returns during his frequent trips to the dens of London.

The novel is one of the strongest and earliest depictions of the human rights abuses the marriage laws of the period were capable of encouraging.

The prose meekly screams at this pathetic injustice and rightly so. The writing style is extremely circumlocutious in places and only very patient, bedridden readers will want to wade through the long monologues and nature descriptions.

I mean this in comparison with other novels of the period, so heed that warning. The structure works surprisingly well as the narrative is handed back to Gilbert, although the clumsy recourse to letters to keep the story going makes the last quarter a painful flop technically speaking.

Excellent work. Next: Charley. May 03, Sarah rated it really liked it. Poor Helen. Poor Anne. Poor book Her voice, in many ways, completes the harmony and picks up where the two of them leave off.

True, there are no fires, ghosts, or windswept moors. But, as one critic noted, "The slamming of Helen's bedroom door against her husband reverberated throughout Victorian England.

It's difficult for me to separate the author from her time. This book suffers from the usual problems inherent to the period.

The story is, by necessity, a little drawn out. There's the contrived excuse for narration, superfluous to contemporary readers, etc.

The story, however, is evenly written and the characterization is stunningly deep. I admit, I initially found Helen a little too rigid, too cold, and perhaps emotionally dependent on her son.

I came to understand her and her choices. Yes, a pious Helen is not especially worldly. She's not especially brazen.

Yet there's courage in that quiet demeanor. There's a still, small voice that refuses to waver. It's true, her beliefs aren't my beliefs.

But I admire her fortitude.

The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall Video

WATCH THIS before you read The Tenant of Wildfell Hall Community Reviews. She is born there and only comes back because she is running away from her alcoholic husband. The heroine is a woman also called Helen, who she hides from her past in click abusive marriage in a present-day Yorkshire village. Markham thinks it will do you good, as you were tired with your walk; but she will not oblige you to take it! I do not think Click the following article. Next To J. The driver who takes him to Staningley informs Gilbert that Helen is now an heiress. Nevertheless, they bore it very well, being all in their holiday humours. It was with an agitated, burning heart and brain that I hurried homewards, regardless of that scorching noonday sun—forgetful of everything but her I had just left—regretting nothing but her impenetrability, and my own precipitancy and want of tact—fearing nothing but her hateful resolution, and my inability to overcome it—hoping nothing—but halt,—I will not bore you with my conflicting hopes and fears—my serious yoshi and resolves. The fields, being rough and stony, read more wholly unfit for the plough, were mostly devoted to the pasturing of sheep and cattle; the soil was thin and poor: bits of grey rock here and there peeped out from the grassy hillocks; bilberry-plants go here heather—relics of more savage wildness—grew under the walls; and in many of the enclosures, ragweeds and rushes usurped supremacy over the scanty herbage; but these were not my property.